Student personal learning networks – a transliterate approach

I love the domino effect – the arrival of Bobbi Newman’s latest post in my inbox this morning led me first to another viewing of the excellent Buffy Hamilton’s presentation called Framing Transliterate Learning Through Inquiry and Participatory Culture. Bobbi kindly included the list of readings consulted by Buffy while preparing the presentation, which in turn led me to a blog by Wendy DG, called Teach Web.

This led me not only to a post which includes an excellent diagram of the transliterate processes used by students undertaking research – it also, finally, forced me to set up a feed in Google Reader.  I know, for someone who purports to be an early adopter, you’re asking yourself “Why hasn’t she had an RSS feed for the last how-ever-many-years?”  Well, I’ve tried, and failed many times. I never go back to them, they have been too far off the radar. Twitter feeds are more immediate, and I love the serendipity of discovery in that environment.

However, now that I am expending a lot of energy on curating – using Scoop.it to collate information on a range of topics, it seems more timely to develop some feeds that directly support that activity. The other plus is that now I’m working on a Mac, using Firefox as my browser, feeds can be much more in my face – a good thing for someone attempting to deal with a new disorder – infotention! If you have the same problem, try following this scoop from Howard Rheingold – there be gold in them thar hills…

And on reading this back, I can see that the schizophrenic nature of this post would make me an excellent case study for someone researching in the new field of infotention disorders – any takers?

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